Gluten-Free Skillet Flatbread

For Bread Week 19, I decided to make a quick Gluten-Free Skillet Flatbread. I wanted something that would go with some finger foods that I had bought over the weekend, and this fit the bill. I wish I could tell you that I made them perfectly, but I didn’t. I think it’s a good recipe, though, if you cook them correctly, as I did not.

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Gluten-Free Skillet Flatbread (adapted from Serious Eats)

2 1/4 cups (9 1/4oz) gluten-free flour of your choice (I used 4oz millet flour and 5 1/4oz sorghum flour, with brown rice flour for dusting)
3/4 cup (3oz) tapioca starch
1 tbsp baking powder
3/4 tsp salt
1/2 tsp xanthan gum (I think I would bump this up by 1/4 tsp)
1/2-3/4 cup water (I added the full amount, but start with the 1/2 cup)
1 egg
3 tbsp olive oil, plus more for frying

In a large bowl, combine dry ingredients. Add wet ingredients. Stir until a stiff dough forms. (I considered mine wet, not stiff, since I added 3/4 cup water, but in retrospect the dough wasn’t difficult to work with.) Turn dough out onto floured surface and shape into a ball. Divide into 10 pieces. Form each piece into a ball and roll out into a 5-inch round.

Original instructions say to heat 1 tsp olive oil over high heat in a cast iron skillet and to cook 2 rounds at a time for 4 minutes per side. This was problematic for me. High on my stove is entirely too hot, and the cast iron holds the heat very well. I recommend heating oil in a cast iron skillet on medium-medium high. Cook on each side for 3 minutes.

I liked the way the dough came together. My dough was moist (in my opinion) and not too stiff, and although it fell apart easily, it was easy enough to work with. I had no problem rolling out the dough. I used my bench scraper to carefully transfer the rounds to the skillet, because they were too fragile to handle without support. I was frustrated by the overly hot skillet, which scorched the bread. I turned down the heat gradually, but by the time I cooked my last two flatbreads, I had decided that a medium-high was appropriate for my stove and skillet. I shortened the cooking time, too, because it was the only way I could get the bread to not burn so much.

I think that this should be a very solid recipe if I can cook it without burning it. The flavor was fine. The texture was a little sandy, but not bad at all. The bread, when cooked more properly, puffed up in places – a great sign. I didn’t have time to try it again, but I want to.

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